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Killer

Killer

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Beginning with the same phased snare drums that Neal Smith employed on “Refrigerator Heaven,” double, roughhewn guitars of the utmost attack that push forward in nail-biting fretting-ness to underscore the same frustration Alice voiced in “I’m Eighteen” only reinforced by a low, authoritative refrain straight offa “Summertime Blues” when a parental unit laments: “Honey, where did we fail? The song “Dead Babies” stirred up some controversy following the album’s release, despite the fact that its lyrics conveyed an “anti-child abuse” message.

Alice’s restrained vocals borrow a loose woman from Rod Stewart’s “Every Picture Tells A Story” (“And it was. The remainder of the album casts itself into a single journey crossfaded into parts unknown, much like the gothic run-in of “Second Coming”/”Ballad Of Dwight Fry” from their previous LP, “Love It To Death” (and like those two aforementioned tracks, were not banded separately on album.

Punk icons Jello Biafra and the Melvins covered the song "Halo of Flies" on their 2005 release Sieg Howdy! The 103 third parties who use cookies on this service do so for their purposes of displaying and measuring personalized ads, generating audience insights, and developing and improving products. We don’t share your credit card details with third-party sellers, and we don’t sell your information to others. According to an NPR radio interview with Alice Cooper, "Desperado" was written about Robert Vaughn's character from the movie The Magnificent Seven (1960). Steve Paul scenester/ex-McCoys guitarist Rick Derringer supplies rip-roaring guitar here and it sets up the rest of the album for off-the-cuff, sleazy racket-making perfectly.

Liner notes Archived 2011-07-19 at the Wayback Machine from " The Life and Crimes of Alice Cooper", Rhino Records Box Set, 1999, Catalog No: RHIN 75680. Yeah Yeah Yeah” follows, rocking out over the introductory riff to Cream’s “Toad” played by twin SG guitars free of the fear of any ponderous drum solo to follow. It slows down into the sudden calm of rapid drum rolls and funereal guitar slashing as cries and screams tear away in the background, then cryptic and near-confessional whispering. With tribal tom-tom drums and near-backwards soaring guitar lines, “Killer” emerges from a courtroom argument that ends the “Dead Babies” descending guitar sick-out like a tattered zombie slumping through a late night mist.

First official release of a live set by the Alice Cooper band since the 2001's release of the deluxe edition of "Billion Dollar Babies", but certainly been worth the wait. Dunaway’s zooming basslines, Smith drops in on a dime every time and Buxton burns down on a stuck riff much like he did previously at the end of “Ballad Of Dwight Fry” only here it’s even more of an ear-ringing, circular op-art pattern AND threatens to go on for even longer, if you can believe it. Halo of Flies” was, according to Cooper’s liner notes in the compilation The Definitive Alice Cooper, an attempt by the band to prove that they could perform King Crimson-like progressive rock suites, and was supposedly about a SMERSH-like organisation. And it sees Alice rollin’ hastily outta bed out from under a mountain of empty Budweiser cans, applying his smeared, runny mascara all around his glazballs with a clawed, talon’d hand then running his fingers through his ratty, knotted black mane, quickly hooking Katchina the snake ‘round his neck, throws back the warm backwash from the last beer of the afternoon and he’s off -- And so are The Coopers, in full force for the duration of this airtight, upright and skintight rock’n’roll album.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
  • Sold by: Fruugo

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